Discussing the Warp Bundles

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Our warp bundles are meant to be fun...it's time to let your inner child play around.  You will be responsible for deciding where you want the various yarns. 

Where do you want all your thick yarns (spaced out or perhaps just on the ends or the center?).  Where do you want, for example the red yarns?  Spaced fairly evenly across, or localized to one side only?  Fuzzy yarns?  Bumpy yarns?  Each decision will affect the final look of your project, and that is what makes this so much fun.  Perhaps you are inclined to do what I do, and just go with random placement. It's very freeing, and addictive. 

Now for a little math.............To determine the width of your project, it's just a simple division problem.....

If you are using a 5 dent reed, and you get a 40 ends warp bundle - your project will be 8" - great for a scarf!

You know that in each inch of your reed, you can fit 5 different yarns.  Simply take the number of ends you will receive (40) and divide that by the number of ends you can fit in each inch of weaving width (5) you will have 40/5 = 8. 

If you are using a 5 dent reed, and you purchase an 80 ends warp bundle - your project will be 16".  Just like the above example, only this time the formula is 80/5 = 16 - great for a scarf, or pillows for example.

If you are using a 10 dent reed, and you purchase a 40 ends warp bundle - your project will be 4" - great for a sash or double wrap for a cowl or a long skinny scarf. 

You know that in each inch of your reed, you can fit 10 different yarns.  Simply take the number of ends you will get (40) and divide that by the number of ends you can fit in each inch of weaving width (10) you will have 40/10 = 4. 

If you are using a 10 dent reed, and you purchase an 80 ends warp bundle - your project will be 8".  Just like the above example, only this time the formula is 80/10 = 8.

Now having said all that, you can easily increase or decrease the width of your project by either skipping a hole or slot or doubling up and putting two ends in the same slot or hole.  Depending on the thickness of the yarns, this can help create texture, or it can allow for more open areas in your weaving. 

We hope you have fun.

 

 
PJ Holtzman